Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve

Australia is home to some of the world's most unique wildlife and wilderness.

A Forever Home for Wildlife

Australia is home to some of the world's most unique wildlife and wilderness. But, as the human population grows and moves further into habitat, wild places are shrinking and species are disappearing.

SAVING STEVE'S PLACE

The Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve is a haven for the natural world. The 330,000 acres (130,000 hectares) of untouched paradise are bursting with wildlife across 35 diverse ecosystems. Rare and endangered species thrive at the Reserve and thanks to 451,234 people who signed the petition and campaigned to save it; Steve's place will remain this way.

A WIN FOR CONSERVATION

This beautiful part of the world was one of Steve's favourite places because of its abundance of crocodiles. After his passing, it was gifted to his family and set aside as a place for scientific research and discovery. Just days after it was announced, a mining company's plans threatened to destroy it all. No time was wasted; Terri Irwin launched a campaign to protect it forever. Now, as a Strategic Environmental Area, Steve's place has more protection than the Great Barrier Reef.

A NEW ECOSYSTEM

One of the ecosystems here is a completely new type of environment, previously unknown to mankind - the Perched Bauxite Springs. What researchers have discovered so far is astonishing. The acidic PH levels of the water should mean they can't sustain life, but many species have thrived. Species of reptiles, fish and amphibians appear to have adapted to the unique environment. The springs also act like a sponge, filtering water down to a layer of aquifer and soaking up water in the monsoonal wet season to recharge the river in the dry season. They're a crucial part of the river system that supports so many lives.

PROTECTED WILD PLACES

With the Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve, we're now protecting over 450,000 acres (over 180,000 hectares) of precious habitat throughout Queensland. From arid regions in the Brigalow Belt to prime eucalypt bushland on the Great Dividing Range, these conservation properties are giving rare species such as the palm cockatoo, woma python and koala, a real chance at flourishing.

 

A gift from you today will help conservationists and researchers discover more about the unique species within these wild places and how to truly protect them. Will you help us, help them?